History of Science

Who invented our time schedule?

About 4,000 years ago, the Babylonians invented the first calendar that divided the time into the movement of the planets.

The Babylonians observed celestial bodies and made the first calendar.

© IBSS

Thousands of years have been planed for our time structure.

Around 4,000 years ago, the Babylonians in present-day Iraq introduced a calendar that was divided into years, months, and weeks based on the movements of the great celestial bodies.

A year was the time when the earth revolved around the sun once, and a month was the time it took the moon to revolve around the earth.

Seven-day week comes from space

The Babylonians knew seven celestial bodies: sun, moon, Mars, Jupiter, Mercury, Venus and Saturn.

Although our division of the week is independent of astronomical phenomena, these seven celestial bodies probably formed the basis for the seven-day week.

The day is the time that the sun is above the horizon. In Egypt, the light part of a day with a sundial was divided into hours. A twelfth part of the light day was called a hora, "hour."

ROMANS GIVE THE MONTHS THEIR NAME

  • March is named after the war god Mars.

  • April may come from the word aperire, "open."

  • May & June are named after the goddesses Maia and Juno.

  • July & August derive their name from Julius Caesar and Emperor Augustus.

  • September, October, November & December means seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth month.

  • January & February are added later and are named after the god Janus and the cleaning festival February.

Video: Who Came Up With Days, Hours, Minutes and Seconds? (February 2020).

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